Hammersmith Terrace Emery Walker

Hammersmith Terrace

Hammersmith Terrace was home to many creative neighbours in Walker’s day.

Emery Walker’s House at 7 Hammersmith Terrace is one of 17 tall, narrow houses, built on the north bank of the River Thames between Chiswick Mall and Lower Mall in the 1750s.

Back then, Hammersmith and Chiswick were still villages, several miles west of the fringes of London. The street would still have looked quite rural and was bordered on the north by market gardens.

By the time Emery Walker moved into the Terrace in the late 1870s the character of the area, and of the Terrace, had changed a great deal. The market gardens had given way to smaller houses and industry such as waterworks, breweries, and timber wharves.

Despite the changes, the area remained popular with various artists because of the beauty of its riverside location.

 

Edward Johnston’s daughter, in her father's biography, said that the houses on Hammersmith Terrace had:

'basements and no bathrooms – not so much as a tap above the ground floor – but they had great charm and a wonderful view and little gardens running down to the river wall.'

The author, AP Herbert, whose blue plaque can be seen at No. 12, described the terrace as having:

 

'something, perhaps, of an old village and something of a Cathedral Close, something of Venice and something of the sea.' ( 'The House by the River', 1920).

 

Hammersmith Terrace became a particular 'hot spot' for members of the Arts & Crafts Movement. They  visited each others' homes regularly and often congregated around the post box at the end of the terrace for a late night chat while catching the last post.

Hover and click on the doors to find out who lived behind them. If you would like to continue walking along  the river you can follow our trail along the Thames and we’ll take you on a tour of the famous people who made Hammersmith their home. Please note, the doors shown below are private residences and are not open to the public.

1 Hammersmith Terrace
1 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 1: It was here that the Doves Press was set up.

3 Hammersmith Terrace
3 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 3: Was inhabited by calligrapher and typographer Edward Johnston who designed the sans-serif Johnston typeface that was used throughout the London Underground system. Francis Osler, RIBA also lived here before moving to No. 11.

5 Hammersmith Terrace
5 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 5: The leading wood engraver WH Hooper lived here.

7 Hammersmith Terrace
7 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 7: Was originally occupied by bookbinder TJ Cobden Sanderson, then later by Emery Walker.

7A Hammersmith Terrace
7A Hammersmith Terrace

No. 7a: Was rented from Emery Walker, who owned what had been No. 7's stable, by sculptor and type designer Eric Gill. This was the address used for his work, he lived nearby at 20 Black Lion Lane.

8 Hammersmith Terrace
8 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 8: Lived in by May Morris, daughter of William and Jane. May was was an embroiderer, political activist, jewellery designer and author. She was a friend of George Bernard Shaw, who lived here as her lodger. Mary Annie Sloane, etcher, engraver and founder member of the Women's Guild of Art (which May had founded) took over the lease of number 8 after May.

10 Hammersmith Terrace
10 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 10: Inhabited by FG Stephens, a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

11 Hammersmith Terrace
11 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 11: Francis Osler, RIBA resided here after leaving no. 3.

12 Hammersmith Terrace
12 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 12: A.P Herbert lived here. Herbert was a novelist, playwright and law reform activist who served as an independent MP for Oxford University from the 1935 to the 1950 general election, when university constituencies were abolished.

14 Hammersmith Terrace
14 Hammersmith Terrace

No. 14: Inhabited by Douglas Pepler an English printer, writer and poet, and an associate of both Eric Gill and GK Chesterton. Pepler started life as a businessman but became interested in social improvement. In 1905 he and his wife moved to No. 14. Inspired by Morris, he founded the Hampshire House Club, a working mens' club modelled on Toynbee Hall.

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